2016

Part A

Part B

Jakarta

Models of Collective Space for the Extended Metropolis  

 

 

The research examines the scale and distribution of the most prominent urban development types throughout Jakarta. Organized by five discrete land-use types (religious, commercial, residential, recreational, and industrial), the work identifies the scale and distribution of the most dominant geometries in the city and their affiliated programs. The research clearly shows a city with developmental models that rely heavily on large scale, single footprint buildings that have little or no connection to their adjacencies. In recent decades, the rapid construction of global capital enclaves has created an extended and highly fragmented urban landscape with little or no street life. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The design project aims to create a shared space inviting the communities from the two sides of the canal to interact, by introducing a school bridge that doubles as a transit hub. The bridge brings public amenities to a monolithic scale, and generates with its dramatic presence a sense of urbanity within its depleted surroundings. Slight sectional changes allow private and public spaces to coexist in one structure. The bridge takes the form of a single gesture that is simultaneously solid and hollow, uniform and heterogeneous, foreign and familiar. Inspired by Gordon Cullen’s serial vision, the project is presented through a series of perspective moments that shape the plan of the bridge. Placed in such a way that it addresses its surroundings, the Bridge School connects the two sides of the canal together, providing a central, social space. The broader social aspect of the project answers to the community needs rather than simply those of a primary school. Space is organized by a linear and a diagonal path, one allowing for the private access to the school and the other intersecting a variety of public programs and creating areas for different types of collective interaction. Some spaces face outwards inviting public life in, while others face inwards creating different conditions of interiority. Openings allows for visual connection between the bottom and top floors.

The work was published as part of the Jakarta: Models of Collective Space for the Extended Metropolis, studio report, Harvard University Graduate School of Design, Spring 2016.

Collective
Collective

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Industrial
Industrial

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Religion
Religion

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Collective
Collective

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1/5

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1/9
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