2019

Re-shaping the Vessel 

Amman Design Week 

 

 

 The tradition of ceramics in the Mena region has been present for millenia, dating back to the coiled pots of 900 BPE Mesopotamia up to the modern era. Unfortunately the use of traditional ceramic pots in the household has diminished and regional turmoil has affected tourism, leaving ceramic practitioners unsure of the future of their craft. 

Ceramics have the potential to produce a great diversity of shapes through a variety of material processes. This project aims to rethink the vessel and broaden the scope of the practise of ceramics in Jordan to encompass new possibilities that can cater to current demands. This project engages in a dialogue between the handmade, digital and industrial techniques and processes. 

The mashrabiya derives its name from the word sharaba - to drink - because the space was once enclosed and used to store drinking pots. It later evolved into a room with a full 

enclosure. Ceramics are very efficient at storing water, and are used in certain regions of the world for irrigation. Irrigation pots also known as ollas, are filled with water and buried near plants. The top of the pot extends above the ground in order to be refilled and water seeps through the clay irrigating the roots and allowing the plants to absorb 100 percent of the water. 

The ceramic mashrabiya I have designed is envisioned to work as a vertical architectural olla.

press to zoom

press to zoom

press to zoom

press to zoom
1/5